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Items tagged "Barbarian": 44

The Dying Gaul

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The Dying Gaul is a Roman copy of a 3rd century Greek statue. It depicts a gaul with a wound in his lower chest. His hair, mustache and torc necklace identify him as a barbarian.

Barbarian Child on the Ara Pacis

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The Are Pacis, or the Altar of Augustan Peace, was constructed in the 1st century BC in order to commemorate Augustus's journeys to Gaul and Hispania. Originally, the two young boys on the Ara Pacis were declared to be Gaius and Lucius Caesar, but they are now believed to be barbarian children.

The Ludovisi Gaul (Gaul Killing Himself and His Wife)

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This sculpture dates to 2nd century AD Rome, and it depicts a gaul killing himself and his wife. It is a copy of the 3rd century BC hellenistic statue of the Pergamon victory over the Gauls.

The Gaul Killing Himself and His Wife

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This marble statue from the 2nd century AD remains one of the most fascinating sculptures of a Barbarian in Roman art. A part of the Ludovisi collection in the Palazzo Altemps, the creator is unknown, but is likely to be a Roman copy of a Greek sculpture from an earlier time period [not likely, according to Marvin!]. This statue demonstrates a…

The Ludovisi Gaul killing himself and his wife

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This artwork is currently located in the National Museum of Rome, Palazzo Altemps. The sculpture is [likely] from the 2nd century AD, but it is believed to be a Roman copy of a Greek original from the 1st century BC [if it is a copy - which is debated - the original would be earlier than that]. The statue portrays a man in the act of killing…

Barbarian King Imprisoned

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This colossal marble statue shows a conquered barbarian king. Though the king is captured and downcast, the size of the statue is unusually large. His size may be related to the desire to monumentalize non-Roman enemies, therefore implying the Romans are even greater for conquering such an impressive figure. The statue now stands in the courtyard…

Ludovisi Gaul Killing Himself and His Wife

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Ancient statue depicting a barbarian man (presumably a Gaul) in the act of plunging a sword into his breast, looking backward defiantly while he supports the dying figure of a woman with his left arm. The sculpture now resides in the Museo Nazionale di Roma, Palazzo Altemps, in Rome.

The Dying Gaul

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The Dying Gaul was first found in the collections of the Ludovisi in 1623 and is currently located in the Capitoline Museum in Rome. The marble statue depicts a man sitting on the ground with a wound in his chest that oozes blood. The man's shaggy hair, torque, and otherwise absence of clothes are characteristic features of barbarian depictions in…

The Gaul Killing Himself and His Wife

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Located in Rome's Palazzo Altemps, The Gaul Killing Himself and His Wife is a marble statue that first made an appearance in the inventories of the Ludovisi collection in 1623. The statue group depicts a man, identified by art historians as a Gaul, wearing nothing but a cloak, plunging a sword into his chest. Beside him, a woman in a tunic and…