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Items tagged "Caracalla": 14

Baths of Caracalla

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The Baths of Caracalla were one of the largest public baths in Rome, and featured two palaestras, a frigidarium, tepidarium, caldarium, and natatio. Baths did not solely serve a functional purpose, though; they were generally also a place to socialize and look for dinner invitations.

Arcus Argentariorium

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It is an ancient Roman arch located between the Palatine Hill and the Tiber River on the Via del Velabro. It is not a triumphal arch as there are no curves [you mean, no arched bay?] and is said to be commissioned by the local money-changers and merchants in honor of Septimius Severus. This arch can be an example of “damnatio memoriae” as the…

Baths of Caracalla

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These very large baths were commissioned by Caracalla, emperor from 198 to 217 A.D. [by himself, emperor from 211 to 217] Like other baths, these baths included a frigidarium (cold room), a tepidarium (warm room), a calidarium (hot room), and palaestras (exercise fields). These baths were a great place for social gatherings, where people would make…

Arch of Septimius Severus

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Marble victory arch officially celebrating Septimius Severus' victory over the Parthians, but constructed following a civil war. Depicts a triumphal procession featuring barbarian captives. Geta was chiseled out of the frieze after his murder by Caracalla. Stands in the Roman Forum.

Arch of Septimius Severus

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The Arch of Septimius Severus was built in 203 AD to commemorate victories against the Parthians. The Arch currently resides in the Roman Forum at the base of the Capitoline Hill. Initially, Septimius Severus and his two sons, Caracalla and Geta sat atop the Arch. However, when Caracalla had Geta assassinated, Caracalla ordered for a damnatio…

Baths of Caracalla

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The Baths of Caracalla are massive thermae baths initially built by Septimius Severus and then ultimately completed by Caracalla in the early 3rd century AD. The Baths are constructed out of brick faced concrete and marble with pleasant mosaics covering the Baths' floor. With the strategic placement of heating pools and the presence of hypocaust,…

Arch of Septimius Severus

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The Arch of Septimius Severus, awarded to the Emperor Septimius Severus and his sons Caracalla and Geta in AD 203 for their conquests in Parthia, is one of the arches comprising the triumphal route that made its way through the city and up to the Temple of Jupiter on the Capitoline Hill. The Arch is noteworthy for its depiction of the subjugation…

Arch of Septimius Severus

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The arch is located in the Roman Forum in Rome and was built in 203 AD. It was originally dedicated to Septimius Severus and his sons Caracalla and Geta, but the inscription was later changed to remove Geta's name after Caracalla murdered him. The base of the arch shows Barbarians who seemed to have been captured by Romans, as they are bound in…

Baths of Caracalla

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The Baths of Caracalla are the second largest Roman public baths ever built, behind the Baths of Diocletian. Termed "thermae," the baths could accommodate up to 10,000 people at once, and served a multi-faceted purpose of bathing, socializing, exercising, and even prostitution. As the baths played such a prominent role in everyday Roman citizens'…

Baths of Caracalla

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The Baths of Caracalla were the second of the huge Imperial thermal of Rome (after those of Trajan) capable of accommodating perhaps 10,000 people at once.