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Dying Gaul

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Dublin Core

Title

Dying Gaul

Description

The contorted face of the "Dying Gaul" depicts pain and suffering. The slouch in his posture shows defeat, which is amplified by the fatal wound in his side and the dull sword on the ground next to him. The torque necklace, unruly hair, and mustache signify his barbarian status. The "Dying Gaul" is thought to be a copy of a statue from the Greek original, which was produced in the third century BC to celebrate the victory of Pergamon over the Gauls. However, according to Miranda Marvin in "The Ludovisi Barbarians," the barbarian depicted in the statue is not definitely a Gaul, although he is a barbarian of some sort (208-211). The "Dying Gaul" was found in the gardens of Villa Ludovisi in the 1620s in Rome (205). The statue is currently located in the Capitoline Museum in Piazza del Campidoglio.

Creator

Unknown

Source

The detail of the sword and face is a personal photograph taken by Jacqueline Crispino

Picture of the full statue:
"National Gallery of Art." The Dying Gaul. Web. 09 June 2017. https://www.nga.gov/content/ngaweb/press/exh/3655.html

Works Cited:
Marvin, Miranda. “The Ludovisi Barbarians: The Grand Manner.” Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome. Supplementary Volumes, vol. 1, 2002, pp. 205–223.

Date

1st or 2nd Century AD

Contributor

Jacqueline Crispino

Rights

Public domain

Format

Marble

Type

Statue

Geolocation